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21 / 08 / 2018
Channel Image18:00 SearchCap: Google Assistant finds good news, GSC updates, Google Image search traffic & more» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
Channel Image17:40 A checklist: Important SEO points to cover in a content campaign» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
Contributor Paddy Moogan shares a checklist of key on-page and analytical items and how to SEO them so your content campaign runs smoothly and supports your ranking efforts. 

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
Channel Image16:57 Google Analytics shows how to find Google Image search traffic when Google Images changes the referral URL» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
Curious how Google Analytics will show your traffic coming from Google Image search after the pre-announced referrer URL change? Google has documented it for us in a blog post.

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Channel Image13:37 Google Assistant will now find you ‘good news’» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
‘OK, Google: Tell me something good’ triggers positive news stories from the Solutions Journalism Network.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
Channel Image12:29 NEW On-Demand Crawl: Quick Insights for Sales, Prospecting, & Competitive Analysis» Moz Blog

Posted by Dr-Pete

In June of 2017, Moz launched our entirely rebuilt Site Crawl, helping you dive deep into crawl issues and technical SEO problems, fix those issues in your Moz Pro Campaigns (tracked websites), and monitor weekly for new issues. Many times, though, you need quick insights outside of a Campaign context, whether you're analyzing a prospect site before a sales call or trying to assess the competition.

For years, Moz had a lab tool called Crawl Test. The bad news is that Crawl Test never made it to prime-time and suffered from some neglect. The good news is that I'm happy to announce the full launch (as of August 2018) of On-Demand Crawl, an entirely new crawl tool built on the engine that powers Site Crawl, but with a UI designed around quick insights for prospecting and competitive analysis.

While you don’t need a Campaign to run a crawl, you do need to be logged into your Moz Pro subscription. If you don’t have a subscription, you can sign-up for a free trial and give it a whirl.

How can you put On-Demand Crawl to work? Let's walk through a short example together.


All you need is a domain

Getting started is easy. From the "Moz Pro" menu, find "On-Demand Crawl" under "Research Tools":

Just enter a root domain or subdomain in the box at the top and click the blue button to kick off a crawl. While I don't want to pick on anyone, I've decided to use a real site. Our recent analysis of the August 1st Google update identified some sites that were hit hard, and I've picked one (lilluna.com) from that list.

Please note that Moz is not affiliated with Lil' Luna in any way. For the most part, it seems to be a decent site with reasonably good content. Let's pretend, just for this post, that you're looking to help this site out and determine if they'd be a good fit for your SEO services. You've got a call scheduled and need to spot-check for any major problems so that you can go into that call as informed as possible.

On-Demand Crawls aren't instantaneous (crawling is a big job), but they'll generally finish between a few minutes and an hour. We know these are time-sensitive situations. You'll soon receive an email that looks like this:

The email includes the number of URLs crawled (On-Demand will currently crawl up to 3,000 URLs), the total issues found, and a summary table of crawl issues by category. Click on the [View Report] link to dive into the full crawl data.


Assess critical issues quickly

We've designed On-Demand Crawl to assist your own human intelligence. You'll see some basic stats at the top, but then immediately move into a graph of your top issues by count. The graph only displays issues that occur at least once on your site – you can click "See More" to show all of the issues that On-Demand Crawl tracks (the top two bars have been truncated)...

Issues are also color-coded by category. Some items are warnings, and whether they matter depends a lot on context. Other issues, like "Critcal Errors" (in red) almost always demand attention. So, let's check out those 404 errors. Scroll down and you'll see a list of "Pages Crawled" with filters. You're going to select "4xx" in the "Status Codes" dropdown...

You can then pretty easily spot-check these URLs and find out that they do, in fact, seem to be returning 404 errors. Some appear to be legitimate content that has either internal or external links (or both). So, within a few minutes, you've already found something useful.

Let's look at those yellow "Meta Noindex" errors next. This is a tricky one, because you can't easily determine intent. An intentional Meta Noindex may be fine. An unintentional one (or hundreds of unintentional ones) could be blocking crawlers and causing serious harm. Here, you'll filter by issue type...

Like the top graph, issues appear in order of prevalence. You can also filter by all pages that have issues (any issues) or pages that have no issues. Here's a sample of what you get back (the full table also includes status code, issue count, and an option to view all issues)...

Notice the "?s=" common to all of these URLs. Clicking on a few, you can see that these are internal search pages. These URLs have no particular SEO value, and the Meta Noindex is likely intentional. Good technical SEO is also about avoiding false alarms because you lack internal knowledge of a site. On-Demand Crawl helps you semi-automate and summarize insights to put your human intelligence to work quickly.


Dive deeper with exports

Let's go back to those 404s. Ideally, you'd like to know where those URLs are showing up. We can't fit everything into one screen, but if you scroll up to the "All Issues" graph you'll see an "Export CSV" option...

The export will honor any filters set in the page list, so let's re-apply that "4xx" filter and pull the data. Your export should download almost immediately. The full export contains a wealth of information, but I've zeroed in on just what's critical for this particular case...

Now, you know not only what pages are missing, but exactly where they link from internally, and can easily pass along suggested fixes to the customer or prospect. Some of these turn out to be link-heavy pages that could probably benefit from some clean-up or updating (if newer recipes are a good fit).

Let's try another one. You've got 8 duplicate content errors. Potentially thin content could fit theories about the August 1st update, so this is worth digging into. If you filter by "Duplicate Content" issues, you'll see the following message...

The 8 duplicate issues actually represent 18 pages, and the table returns all 18 affected pages. In some cases, the duplicates will be obvious from the title and/or URL, but in this case there's a bit of mystery, so let's pull that export file. In this case, there's a column called "Duplicate Content Group," and sorting by it reveals something like the following (there's a lot more data in the original export file)...

I've renamed "Duplicate Content Group" to just "Group" and included the word count ("Words"), which could be useful for verifying true duplicates. Look at group #7 – it turns out that these "Weekly Menu Plan" pages are very image heavy and have a common block of text before any unique text. While not 100% duplicated, these otherwise valuable pages could easily look like thin content to Google and represent a broader problem.


Real insights in real-time

Not counting the time spent writing the blog post, running this crawl and diving in took less than an hour, and even that small amount of time spent uncovered more potential issues than what I could cover in this post. In less than an hour, you can walk into a client meeting or sales call with in-depth knowledge of any domain.

Keep in mind that many of these features also exist in our Site Crawl tool. If you're looking for long-term, campaign insights, use Site Crawl (if you just need to update your data, use our "Recrawl" feature). If you're looking for quick, one-time insights, check out On-Demand Crawl. Standard Pro users currently get 5 On-Demand Crawls per month (with limits increasing at higher tiers).

Your On-Demand Crawls are currently stored for 90 days. When you re-enter the feature, you'll see a table of all of your recent crawls (the image below has been truncated):

Click on any row to go back to see the crawl data for that domain. If you get the sale and decide to move forward, congratulations! You can port that domain directly into a Moz campaign.

We hope you'll try On-Demand Crawl out and let us know what you think. We'd love to hear your case studies, whether it's sales, competitive analysis, or just trying to solve the mysteries of a Google update.


Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

Channel Image08:32 New Google Search Console has added the links reports from the old interface» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
Google continues to port features from the old Google Search Console to the new beta Search Console.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
20 / 08 / 2018
Channel Image20:00 Google marks 14 years as a public company» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
Today the search giant ranks as the world’s third most valuable company.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
Channel Image18:00 SearchCap: Google Drive rebrands, visual and voice search, Amazon’s ad opportunities & more» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
Channel Image16:58 [Reminder] Ramp Up Your Amazon Ad Game: 5 tips for success» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
Join us for this live webinar on Thursday, August 23, at 1:00 PM ET (10:00 AM PT).

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
Channel Image15:23 How Visual and Voice Search Are Revitalizing The Role of SEO» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
Contributor Jim Yu outlines how savvy marketers are using voice and visual search to engage more meaningfully with audiences at each stage of their purchase journey.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
Channel Image12:21 Google Drive’s rebrand to Google One includes offers for hotels found in Search» Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing
Deals on hotels found in Google Search are spotlighted in the Benefits section of the new Google One app, with plans to add more promotions from Google properties.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
17 / 08 / 2018
Channel Image23:23 What Do Dolphins Eat? Lessons from How Kids Search - Whiteboard Friday» Moz Blog

Posted by willcritchlow

Kids may search differently than adults, but there are some interesting insights from how they use Google that can help deepen our understanding of searchers in general. Comfort levels with particular search strategies, reading only the bold words, taking search suggestions and related searches as answers — there's a lot to dig into. In this week's slightly different-from-the-norm Whiteboard Friday, we welcome the fantastic Will Critchlow to share lessons from how kids search.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hi, everyone. I'm Will Critchlow, founder and CEO of Distilled, and this week's Whiteboard Friday is a little bit different. I want to talk about some surprising and interesting and a few funny facts that I learnt when I was reading some research that Google did about how kids search for information. So this isn't super actionable. This is not about tactics of improving your website particularly. But I think we get some insights — they were studying kids aged 7 to 11 — by looking at how kids interact. We can see some reflections or some ideas about how there might be some misconceptions out there about how adults search as well. So let's dive into it.

What do dolphins eat?

I've got this "What do dolphins eat?" because this was the first question that the researchers gave to the kids to say sit down in front of a search box, go. They tell this little anecdote, a little bit kind of soul-destroying, of this I think it was a seven-year-old child who starts typing dolphin, D-O-L-F, and then presses Enter, and it was like sadly there's no dolphins, which hopefully they found him some dolphins. But a lot of the kids succeeded at this task.

Different kinds of searchers

The researchers divided the ways that the kids approached it up into a bunch of different categories. They found that some kids were power searchers. Some are what they called "developing." They classified some as "distracted." But one that I found fascinating was what they called visual searchers. I think they found this more commonly among the younger kids who were perhaps a little bit less confident reading and writing. It turns out that, for almost any question you asked them, these kids would turn first to image search.

So for this particular question, they would go to image search, typically just type "dolphin" and then scroll and go looking for pictures of a dolphin eating something. Then they'd find a dolphin eating a fish, and they'd turn to the researcher and say "Look, dolphins eat fish." Which, when you think about it, I quite like in an era of fake news. This is the kids doing primary research. They're going direct to the primary source. But it's not something that I would have ever really considered, and I don't know if you would. But hopefully this kind of sparks some thought and some insights and discussions at your end. They found that there were some kids who pretty much always, no matter what you asked them, would always go and look for pictures.

Kids who were a bit more developed, a bit more confident in their reading and writing would often fall into one of these camps where they were hopefully focusing on the attention. They found a lot of kids were obviously distracted, and I think as adults this is something that we can relate to. Many of the kids were not really very interested in the task at hand. But this kind of path from distracted to developing to power searcher is an interesting journey that I think totally applies to grown-ups as well.

In practice: [wat do dolfin eat]

So I actually, after I read this paper, went and did some research on my kids. So my kids were in roughly this age range. When I was doing it, my daughter was eight and my son was five and a half. Both of them interestingly typed "wat do dolfin eat" pretty much like this. They both misspelled "what," and they both misspelled "dolphin." Google was fine with that. Obviously, these days this is plenty close enough to get the result you wanted. Both of them successfully answered the question pretty much, but both of them went straight to the OneBox. This is, again, probably unsurprising. You can guess this is probably how most people search.

"Oh, what's a cephalopod?" The path from distracted to developing

So there's a OneBox that comes up, and it's got a picture of a dolphin. So my daughter, a very confident reader, she loves reading, "wat do dolfin eat," she sat and she read the OneBox, and then she turned to me and she said, "It says they eat fish and herring. Oh, what's a cephalopod?" I think this was her going from distracted into developing probably. To start off with, she was just answering this question because I had asked her to. But then she saw a word that she didn't know, and suddenly she was curious. She had to kind of carefully type it because it's a slightly tricky word to spell. But she was off looking up what is a cephalopod, and you could see the engagement shift from "I'm typing this because Dad has asked me to and it's a bit interesting I guess" to "huh, I don't know what a cephalopod is, and now I'm doing my own research for my own reasons." So that was interesting.

"Dolphins eat fish, herring, killer whales": Reading the bold words

My son, as I said, typed something pretty similar, and he, at the point when he was doing this, was at the stage of certainly capable of reading, but generally would read out loud and a little bit halting. What was fascinating on this was he only read the bold words. He read it out loud, and he didn't read the OneBox. He just read the bold words. So he said to me, "Dolphins eat fish, herring, killer whales," because killer whales, for some reason, was bolded. I guess it was pivoting from talking about what dolphins eat to what killer whales eat, and he didn't read the context. This cracked him up. So he thought that was ridiculous, and isn't it funny that Google thinks that dolphins eat killer whales.

That is similar to some stuff that was in the original research, where there were a bunch of common misconceptions it turns out that kids have and I bet a bunch of adults have. Most adults probably don't think that the bold words in the OneBox are the list of the answer, but it does point to the problems with factual-based, truthy type queries where Google is being asked to be the arbiter of truth on some of this stuff. We won't get too deep into that.

Common misconceptions for kids when searching

1. Search suggestions are answers

But some common misconceptions they found some kids thought that the search suggestions, so the drop-down as you start typing, were the answers, which is bit problematic. I mean we've all seen kind of racist or hateful drop-downs in those search queries. But in this particular case, it was mainly just funny. It would end up with things like you start asking "what do dolphins eat," and it would be like "Do dolphins eat cats" was one of the search suggestions.

2. Related searches are answers

Similar with related searches, which, as we know, are not answers to the question. These are other questions. But kids in particular — I mean, I think this is true of all users — didn't necessarily read the directions on the page, didn't read that they were related searches, just saw these things that said "dolphin" a lot and started reading out those. So that was interesting.

How kids search complicated questions

The next bit of the research was much more complex. So they started with these easy questions, and they got into much harder kind of questions. One of them that they asked was this one, which is really quite hard. So the question was, "Can you find what day of the week the vice president's birthday will fall on next year?" This is a multifaceted, multipart question.

How do they handle complex, multi-step queries?

Most of the younger kids were pretty stumped on this question. Some did manage it. I think a lot of adults would fail at this. So if you just turn to Google, if you just typed this in or do a voice search, this is the kind of thing that Google is almost on the verge of being able to do. If you said something like, "When is the vice president's birthday," that's a question that Google might just be able to answer. But this kind of three-layered thing, what day of the week and next year, make this actually a very hard query. So the kids had to first figure out that, to answer this, this wasn't a single query. They had to do multiple stages of research. When is the vice president's birthday? What day of the week is that date next year? Work through it like that.

I found with my kids, my eight-year-old daughter got stuck halfway through. She kind of realized that she wasn't going to get there in one step, but also couldn't quite structure the multi-levels needed to get to, but also started getting a bit distracted again. It was no longer about cephalopods, so she wasn't quite as interested.

Search volume will grow in new areas as Google's capabilities develop

This I think is a whole area that, as Google's capabilities develop to answer more complex queries and as we start to trust and learn that those kind of queries can be answered, what we see is that there is going to be increasing, growing search volume in new areas. So I'm going to link to a post I wrote about a presentation I gave about the next trillion searches. This is my hypothesis that essentially, very broad brush strokes, there are a trillion desktop searches a year. There are a trillion mobile searches a year. There's another trillion out there in searches that we don't do yet because they can't be answered well. I've got some data to back that up and some arguments why I think it's about that size. But I think this is kind of closely related to this kind of thing, where you see kids get stuck on these kind of queries.

Incidentally, I'd encourage you to go and try this. It's quite interesting, because as you work through trying to get the answer, you'll find search results that appear to give the answer. So, for example, I think there was an About.com page that actually purported to give the answer. It said, "What day of the week is the vice president's birthday on?" But it had been written a year before, and there was no date on the page. So actually it was wrong. It said Thursday. That was the answer in 2016 or 2017. So that just, again, points to the difference between primary research, the difference between answering a question and truth. I think there's a lot of kind of philosophical questions baked away in there.

Kids get comfortable with how they search – even if it's wrong

So we're going to wrap up with possibly my favorite anecdote of the user research that these guys did, which was that they said some of these kids, somewhere in this developing stage, get very attached to searching in one particular way. I guess this is kind of related to the visual search thing. They find something that works for them. It works once. They get comfortable with it, they're familiar with it, and they just do that for everything, whether it's appropriate or not. My favorite example was this one child who apparently looked for information about both dolphins and the vice president of the United States on the SpongeBob SquarePants website, which I mean maybe it works for dolphins, but I'm guessing there isn't an awful lot of VP information.

So anyway, I hope you've enjoyed this little adventure into how kids search and maybe some things that we can learn from it. Drop some anecdotes of your own in the comments. I'd love to hear your experiences and some of the funny things that you've learnt along the way. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com


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